English Pronunciation Practice - Connected Speech, Understand Native Speakers, Speak Fluently

Read More

Learn to improve English pronunciation with 17 phrases to practice connected speech and understand native English speakers and speak English fluently. In connected speech pronunciation changes from standalone pronunciation in English. Enjoy learning American English pronunciation in this Advanced English lesson!

In this American English Pronunciation lesson we’re focusing on connected speech to help you improve your pronunciation, prosody, and communication.
 

Part of what makes it difficult to understand Native English speakers and what makes it challenging to speak English fast and fluently is due to the phenomenon of connected speech.
 

Connected speech is when the pronunciation of words changes slightly due to the other words they are next to.

For example, standalone pronunciation will always be different than connected speech. So pronouncing a word by itself will have different pronunciation than a group of words in a sentence. This is because the context and the environment alters the pronunciation.


In American English we lean heavily on connected speech, which can be confusing to Second Language learners who might not be expecting a different pronunciation
 

To make things easier for you, I’m sharing 17 phrases to learn using connected speech. Knowing these phrases will help you do two things: (1) understand Native English speakers more clearly and (2) speak more fluently.

I’ll be sharing the phrases as well as an example sentence that I’d like you to make note of and repeat as practice.

If you’re ready, let's get started.


>>>
 

Could you
In connected speech we say kyu, the same pronunciation as the letter Q.
Example sentence: Kyu tell me where the nearest coffee shop is?
Could you tell me where the nearest coffee shop is?
Ok now practice it the way I did with the same intonation and pronunciation.
 

Don’t you
In connected speech we say “doncha.”
Example sentence: Doncha wish we had more time in the day?
Don’t you wish we had more time in the day?
Ok now practice it the way I did with the same intonation and pronunciation.
 

Want to 
In connected speech we say “wanna.”
Example sentence: Wanna grab some dinner after work today?
Want to grab some dinner after work today?
Now practice it the way I did with the same intonation and pronunciation.
 

Got to
In connected speech we say “gotta.”
Example sentence: I really gotta run or I’ll be late for my workout class.
I really got to run or I’ll be late for my workout class.
Now practice it the way I did with the same intonation and pronunciation.
 

Going to
In connected speech we say “gonna.”
Example sentence: I’m gonna go to the store in a bit - need anything?
I’m going to go to the store in a bit - need anything?
Now practice it the way I did with the same intonation and pronunciation.
 

Would have
In connected speech we say “wudda.”
Example sentence: I wudda made more banana muffins if I’d known you were coming.
I would’ve made more banana muffins if I’d known you were coming.
Now practice it the way I did with the same intonation and pronunciation.
 

Should have
In connected speech we say “shuda.”
Example sentence: I really shuda spent more time prepping for my interview.
I really should’ve spent more time prepping for my interview.
Now practice it the way I did with the same intonation and pronunciation.
 

Could have
In connected speech we say “kuda.”
Example sentence: We kuda gone camping this weekend, the foliage is out of this world.
We could’ve gone camping this weekend, the foliage is out of this world.
Now practice it the way I did with the same intonation and pronunciation.
 

Have to
In connected speech we say “hafta.”
Example sentence: You didn’t hafta pick me up, I kuda cabbed it. 
You didn’t have to pick me up, I kuda cabbed it. 
Now practice it the way I did with the same intonation and pronunciation.
 

Can you
In connected speech we say “knyu.”
Example sentence: Knyu help with Thanksgiving prep this afternoon? I could really use a hand.
Can you help with Thanksgiving prep this afternoon? I could really use a hand.
Now practice it the way I did with the same intonation and pronunciation.
 

Would you
In connected speech we say “wudyu.”
Example sentence: Wudyu mind turning your music down - it’s a bit loud.
Would you mind turning your music down - it’s a bit loud.
Now practice it the way I did with the same intonation and pronunciation.
 

Will you
In connected speech we say “wuyu.”
Example sentence: Wuyu subscribe to our YouTube channel?
Will you subscribe to our channel?
Now practice it the way I did with the same intonation and pronunciation.
 

Do you
In connected speech we say “dyu.”
Example sentence: Dyu take milk and sugar in your coffee or just drink it black?
Do you take milk and sugar in your coffee or just drink it black?
Now practice it the way I did with the same intonation and pronunciation.
 

Won’t you
In connected speech we say “wontchoo.”
Example sentence: Wontchoo you stay for a cup of tea or glass of something?
Won’t you stay for a cup of tea or glass of something?
Now practice it the way I did with the same intonation and pronunciation.
 

Did you
In connected speech we say “diyoo.” Some people say “didja.” 
Example sentence: Diyoo say something or are my ears playing tricks on me? Or didja say something.
Did you say something or are my ears playing tricks on me?
Now practice it the way I did with the same intonation and pronunciation.
 

What did you
In connected speech we say “whadja.”
Example sentence: Whadja do to your hair? It looks different in a good way.
What did you do to your hair? It looks different in a good way.
Now practice it the way I did with the same intonation and pronunciation.
 

How did you
In connected speech we say “howdja.”
Example sentence: Howdja lift the couch by yourself? You’re insanely strong!
How did you lift the couch by yourself? You’re so insanely strong!
Now practice it the way I did with the same intonation and pronunciation.
 

>>>
 

So those are 17 phrases plus example sentences that you can repeat to practice connected speech. Not only will you start to use connected speech in your own communication in English, but you’ll also be more attuned to it when Native English speakers use connected speech.


Have fun while practicing these phrases and start to pay closer attention to other words and phrases as they are being spoken in sentences. You’ll be more equipped to notice and replicate the connected speech once you practice this linguistic phenomenon.
 

>>>
 

Alright Advanced English learners, thanks for joining me in this lesson. Which phrases will you use first? Do you think you’ll start implementing them as quickly as in your next conversation? Did anything here surprise you? Feel free to share that experience with us in the comments below.


See you in the next one where we’ll continue advancing your English together! Until then, keep up the awesome work.