Native English Conversation about the Impact A.I. will Have on Jobs

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Learn about AI's impact on jobs in this Native English Conversation. We discuss the power of developing your skills, working on creative endeavors, and focusing on learning and development.

00:00:00:04 - 00:00:26:23
Mary Daphne
Hello, Advanced English Learners. Welcome back to another native English speaker conversation. I'm joined by the one and only Greg, so happy to have you here today. So happy to be chatting with you. Greg we always have fun conversations. We do in my opinion, hopefully in your opinion as well. But anyway, I want to remind you that these are a great opportunity for you to practice your listening comprehension, to get used to how native speakers speak.

00:00:26:23 - 00:00:54:07
Mary Daphne
We're not really slowing things down for you to give you an opportunity to hear what that sounds like so that you're more able to navigate conversations that are a little bit faster paced because you know, you're at the advanced English level. So we want to give you those kinds of opportunities and pay attention to our pronunciation, our connected speech, the vocabulary we use, the expressions we use, because this is all going to start to build upon each other, right?

00:00:54:14 - 00:01:15:03
Mary Daphne
And you're just going to have that nice, strong repertoire, right? So that's something to think about. All right. So let's dove into our conversation topic for today, which is what is the future of jobs in regards to how A.I. might come in, might step in?

00:01:15:16 - 00:01:17:19
Greg
So what impact will I have on jobs?

00:01:17:26 - 00:01:22:01
Mary Daphne
Perfect. So let's get into that.

00:01:27:17 - 00:01:44:12
Mary Daphne
All right. So that's a big question. And it's something that we, you know, can definitely percolate over and think about, but not fully answer because it's not at that moment in time yet. It's on the horizon in particular, potentially.

00:01:45:00 - 00:01:47:08
Greg
I would argue in some ways it's already here.

00:01:47:09 - 00:01:50:02
Mary Daphne
Okay. So let's you tell me why. Tell me why you think that.

00:01:50:13 - 00:02:06:27
Greg
Well, let's first start by defining what A.I. perfect. Right? Artificial A.I. stands for artificial intelligence. Exactly. And we have been we meaning the scientific community. I'm not part of it, but.

00:02:07:00 - 00:02:08:24
Mary Daphne
You're part of it. You read a lot of scientific.

00:02:08:24 - 00:02:10:00
Greg
Literature, and I consume it.

00:02:10:01 - 00:02:11:03
Mary Daphne
That's Greg's hobby.

00:02:11:03 - 00:02:27:00
Greg
Yes. So this the scientific community has been excited about A.I. for a very long time. As early as, you know, the invention of computers. Yeah. And it's always felt like it's sort of just ten years away or away.

00:02:27:00 - 00:02:29:01
Mary Daphne
Yeah. Or really ten years.

00:02:29:09 - 00:02:30:27
Greg
Yeah. It always felt like ten, 20.

00:02:30:27 - 00:02:34:25
Mary Daphne
Years from any horizon. From any moment in time. Yes. Even back in the eighties.

00:02:34:25 - 00:02:36:11
Greg
In back of. Back in the fifties.

00:02:36:11 - 00:02:37:09
Mary Daphne
Fifties, yeah.

00:02:38:29 - 00:02:41:06
Greg
Because computers advanced. So quickly.

00:02:41:07 - 00:02:41:22
Mary Daphne
That's true.

00:02:41:22 - 00:02:49:20
Greg
And there's a saying that we often underestimate we overestimate the power of technology in the short term.

00:02:50:03 - 00:02:51:11
Mary Daphne
We underestimate we.

00:02:51:13 - 00:03:06:13
Greg
Overestimate the power of technology in the short term. And we underestimate the power of technology in the long term interest. So that often means is we think think about driving cars. We felt like driving cars. We're going to be here in the next ten years.

00:03:06:27 - 00:03:07:19
Mary Daphne
Automated just.

00:03:07:19 - 00:03:08:06
Greg
Self-Driving.

00:03:08:06 - 00:03:08:29
Mary Daphne
Cars. Self-driving.

00:03:08:29 - 00:03:29:05
Greg
Okay, right. A self-driving cars. We thought they would be here, you know, in two years. And we thought that ten years ago. Yeah, we thought that even 15 years ago. So we're overestimating it in the short term. Yes. So now it kind of feels like, well, they're never really coming because it always feels like it's two years away and every two years they're not here yet.

00:03:29:14 - 00:03:50:27
Greg
So I guess they're never coming. That's when we start to underestimate what they do in the long term. The long term, we really will have AI powered cars and those cars will drive themselves. There will be no steering wheel. And, you know, anyone who drives as perfection will have to have a different profession because driving will be done by computers.

00:03:50:28 - 00:04:18:19
Greg
That will happen and it will completely change the economics of transportation. It'll completely change, you know, the the job market, because a lot of people do drive as a profession and it'll also completely change the you know, like I said, so the economics of that entire industry. So the point is that will have a huge, dramatic systemic impact when it happens.

00:04:18:19 - 00:04:23:22
Greg
We just don't know when it's going to happen. So we start to say, oh, it's never going to happen and therefore we underestimate it.

00:04:24:01 - 00:04:41:02
Mary Daphne
Absolutely. I love that you you shared that sort of that approach because it's so true. Right. One minute we're thinking, oh, yeah, that's right. On the market. Like that's going to be around the corner and we get excited about it and we're like, Yeah, I don't need to learn how to drive because you know, I'm going to be driven by the robots.

00:04:42:08 - 00:04:50:16
Mary Daphne
But, you know, we even see it, you know, when we were in Istanbul, we saw that there the trams some of the trams did not have conductors.

00:04:50:21 - 00:04:52:16
Greg
Yep. Trains trains are definitely an.

00:04:52:16 - 00:04:59:21
Mary Daphne
Example of trams, I think in Japan too. When we were in Japan, I think there was also no conductor at one point.

00:04:59:22 - 00:05:22:17
Greg
There could have been in some of them. Yeah. I mean, if you think about it, that's a very contained tracks on track. The more the more constrained right, the more boundaries there are on a situation, the easier it is to develop A.I. to operate in that context, right? The more broad it is, the more ambiguous it is, the harder it is for AI to operate.

00:05:22:27 - 00:05:47:28
Mary Daphne
For sure. So back to the initial question that we sort of posed at the beginning of the conversation, are jobs going to get replaced by essentially robots? Which jobs are those? Like, what could be, you know, at risk? What are the ones that are not really going to be touched? I think we should talk about that. The remember you showed me the app the other day with that.

00:05:48:04 - 00:05:57:01
Mary Daphne
I that was amazing. I don't want to give too much away because I want you to explain it when you type in those key words. Okay? Yeah, yeah. Listen to this. This is crazy.

00:05:57:01 - 00:06:11:12
Greg
So this has been developed by open A.I., which is a consortium of machine learning developers. And they've been working on a project that the most recent iteration was called GPT three.

00:06:11:19 - 00:06:11:28
Mary Daphne
Okay.

00:06:12:18 - 00:06:20:11
Greg
And that was this you could type in any text and it would output some kind of action based on your text. It's basically interpreting what you're.

00:06:20:11 - 00:06:24:00
Mary Daphne
Writing, like dog playing basketball. Let's just say, well.

00:06:24:13 - 00:06:50:23
Greg
Well, yes, dog play basketball. But to do what? Right. And so originally GPT three, you could say you could have it actually code. So you could say write some code that enables someone to input their name and output, you know, an account, write a name, an email account. And so it'll put together a code. Mm hmm. So that's, you know, text in, text out.

00:06:51:03 - 00:06:55:02
Greg
But what's really cool is the latest iteration called Dolly.

00:06:55:19 - 00:07:06:10
Mary Daphne
Style Valley Dash. Yeah. So I think it's a play on two things. Wall-E, which is a famous movie, amazing movie. If you haven't seen it, please see it. Go do yourself.

00:07:06:10 - 00:07:09:07
Greg
It's a Pixar phenomenal Pixar robot movie.

00:07:09:09 - 00:07:17:26
Mary Daphne
Beautiful. So that's Wall-E. And then the other is Salvador Dali. Dali the artist. Yeah, I think it's a play on both of those.

00:07:18:02 - 00:07:44:27
Greg
He was a surrealist artist. Yeah. And if you look at the art, well, let's explain what this does. So what you do is you type in it's called Dali, and what you do is you type in a few different keywords. You could say a bear eating soup in the woods, and it will produce a picture of a bear eating soup in the woods.

00:07:45:09 - 00:07:48:21
Greg
Now, if you think about it, there are many different ways to represent.

00:07:48:21 - 00:07:49:07
Mary Daphne
Oh, sure.

00:07:49:15 - 00:07:53:28
Greg
Is it a wild, angry looking bear or is it a fun, fluffy looking teddy bear?

00:07:53:28 - 00:07:59:08
Mary Daphne
Is it a photograph like is it a photo realism? Is it surrealism? Is it a painting?

00:07:59:08 - 00:08:03:19
Greg
Right. Is it an illustration? Right. Yeah. Is it for real? Is it an illustration?

00:08:03:19 - 00:08:15:14
Mary Daphne
Because when what you thought of those three things in your head, you painted a very different picture in your mind's eye than what I did in my mind's eye and what Greg did in his mind's eye. That's a very different thing for all of us.

00:08:15:14 - 00:08:33:29
Greg
Yes. And so what this air does is it has its own mind. And the mind has been built on billions and billions of different images that have been labeled. And so it has a bajillion different images of bears, of soup, of woods, of sitting.

00:08:33:29 - 00:08:35:24
Mary Daphne
And then the combinations are endless.

00:08:35:24 - 00:08:53:06
Greg
And it'll just pair a bunch of those together. And so you could type it in five different times. You get five different images. So when you look at it, it's really incredible. You should add the link to the show just so people can play around with it. The gallery, it's actually not open to everyone yet, but why are we spending so much time on this?

00:08:53:15 - 00:09:06:09
Greg
Well, this is an example of how AI is actually producing real creative content. When you look at it, it used to be the assumption was I could do boring, repetitive tasks, right?

00:09:06:09 - 00:09:14:23
Mary Daphne
So thinking of like, you know, tasks that maybe require heavy, heavy machinery or are repetitive or like so dangerous tasks and boring tasks.

00:09:14:23 - 00:09:44:18
Greg
Exactly. Boring tasks meaning repetitive like data entry or, you know, stocking stuff on shelves. Right. Stuff is very straightforward and easy to program. What we're discovering is that AI is even capable of, I would say, creative tasks, tasks that you would expect only a human mind could accomplish. And enough that seems far fetched to you. I really encourage you to check out the Dolly Gallery.

00:09:44:21 - 00:09:48:01
Greg
Yeah. Again, it's not open for public use yet.

00:09:48:01 - 00:09:51:08
Mary Daphne
But you can see some of the things that they showcase.

00:09:51:08 - 00:10:13:19
Greg
Yeah, and it's really incredible. Now, if you're a creator, us, you might be a little worried like, oh, no, I'm going to lose my job. You know, even artists are going to lose their jobs. The reality is, that isn't the case for you. Yeah. And the reason I would argue it's that's not the case. Yeah. Is actually we just watched a show called Westworld.

00:10:13:27 - 00:10:15:09
Mary Daphne
Great shows on HBO.

00:10:15:18 - 00:10:16:09
Greg
A little violent.

00:10:16:21 - 00:10:18:11
Mary Daphne
Yeah. I closed my eyes for those, not.

00:10:18:11 - 00:10:18:28
Greg
For the kids.

00:10:18:28 - 00:10:19:13
Mary Daphne
To be honest.

00:10:19:13 - 00:10:43:07
Greg
But it is conceptually brings up a lot of important concept. Yeah. And one of the, one of the things is that one of the protagonists, one of the main characters, uses AI to build these stories right. And so she tells the computer sort of what's in her head, and the computer takes what she's saying and then kind of fills in the gaps to create a cohesive narrative.

00:10:43:24 - 00:10:49:17
Greg
So what is that? That's human powered. Yeah. And I think that's really where the future is. So.

00:10:49:21 - 00:11:04:21
Mary Daphne
So human is powering it, right? Telling it, giving guidance, giving some instructions, parameters, criteria. Right. We could go on and on with those kinds of concepts. But then AI is doing the output there. It's producing it.

00:11:04:22 - 00:11:07:00
Greg
Yeah. So the air kind of does the grunt work, right.

00:11:07:05 - 00:11:07:24
Mary Daphne
Heavy lifting.

00:11:07:27 - 00:11:34:18
Greg
The human comes up with the ideas. Yeah, spontaneous ideas. Yeah. And the I can interpret them but it's ultimately just doing what the humans sort of guided it to do. And in that way it can really, it can empower, think about a video game. Yeah, right. We could get to a point where a video game developer isn't someone who can actually code, you know, the the different vectors and all the different mathematical physics of, you know, exploding rocks and stuff.

00:11:35:01 - 00:11:46:23
Greg
Instead, all the video game developer does is come up with an idea, right? He tells it to the OR she tells it to the the AI and the AI does the grunt work of putting it all together behind the scenes.

00:11:46:23 - 00:11:52:13
Mary Daphne
So they have to be able to communicate that idea, right? Yes. And now we're back to the importance of communication in.

00:11:52:16 - 00:11:58:15
Greg
That's true. The better you can articulate your ideas, the more effectively you can use the AI to your benefit.

00:11:58:19 - 00:12:20:00
Mary Daphne
So big picture, we learn two things, right? Communication skills are of the utmost importance and they're not going anywhere because we need to be able to communicate with humans and also robots. And then secondly, if you're, you know, a creative or you have creative tasks that you do, don't worry, because you know, you're still going to probably be in demand for that kind of thing.

00:12:20:00 - 00:12:23:10
Greg
Yeah, I wouldn't even say probably. I think your your skills will be even.

00:12:23:10 - 00:12:24:17
Mary Daphne
More and more valued.

00:12:24:19 - 00:12:43:15
Greg
Right? If you're doing something that's sort of boring and repetitive for a job, then that's when you probably want to start looking at developing skills beyond that. Right? Because in the next five, ten years, there's a chance if it's easy to program, it's going to get replaced. So just being aware, it's not you have to panic.

00:12:43:16 - 00:12:44:21
Mary Daphne
Yeah. But you know, start.

00:12:45:02 - 00:13:00:18
Greg
Starting to look at other ways to sort of expand your skillset into more creative, more interpretive abstract types of roles could benefit you because that way you can take advantage of some of the cool new tools coming out.

00:13:00:18 - 00:13:06:00
Mary Daphne
And be at the forefront of that new trend because it's going to happen. It's just a matter of time, like when, right?

00:13:06:09 - 00:13:29:08
Greg
And like it or not, in the near term, it's most likely that these tools will be taken in the language in English. Yes. It's just that most of the reality is most of the development in AI is happening in English, whether it's the research, whether it's the interpreters. And so learning English can be very powerful, a powerful way to make the most of these tools.

00:13:29:08 - 00:13:38:21
Greg
Eventually they will be converted to virtually any language, which is great. But if you want to get sort of that edge, that competitive edge, having a good handle in English can give you that advantage.

00:13:38:25 - 00:14:00:05
Mary Daphne
And you're there, you're getting there, right? You're at the level where if you're able to understand and follow this conversation, you are on the right track. So keep it up because it's going to be even more important than it is already. Right. Amazing. I mean, we could talk on and on about this. We'll probably do a second part of this.

00:14:00:05 - 00:14:28:05
Mary Daphne
But, you know, it's something to consider. As Greg said, start thinking about ways that you can enrich yourself even more. You're already doing that with the Advanced English podcast, which is awesome. So keep it up. And then for the communication you should definitely check out our EXPLearning.co Communications Channel. It's also on YouTube's Advanced English podcast, but you can get all of the resources if you just go to explearing dot co and I'm going to link it below for you and then think about, you know, creativity.

00:14:28:05 - 00:14:48:13
Mary Daphne
How are you going to leverage that in the future or currently? Just something to keep in mind, right? Keep percolating. Right. Have that percolate in the back of your mind so that, you know, you're thinking about it slowly, but you're not, you know, necessarily rushing into anything. It's just something to be aware of. So. All right. Well, that's it for us today.

00:14:48:13 - 00:15:06:24
Mary Daphne
If you want another, you know, two parter on this, let us know in the comments below. Let us know in the Q&A on Spotify. You can find it under the community tab. We love hearing from you. Be sure to share this podcast and this YouTube channel and our website with anyone who wants to improve their English skills and their communication skills.

00:15:07:02 - 00:15:23:07
Mary Daphne
And don't forget to check out explaining because the two together advanced English and Explearning is a very powerful combination. So definitely check that out and we're going to see you right back here for another lesson and conversation very soon. All right, bye for now.