Americans Discussing British English Accent -Vocab-Culture

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What are some similarities and differences between the United States English and United Kingdom English? In this Native English Speaker conversation, we discuss US and UK pronunciation, culture, expressions, and intonation.

00:00:00:04 - 00:00:32:02
Mary Daphne
Hi, everyone. Welcome back. Greg and I are back with another wonderful English conversation for you all to enjoy. And the reason we do this is to give you an opportunity for some nice native English speaker listening practice. As you notice, native English speakers are going to be doing things like connected speech. We're going to be doing different things with our intonation and our inflection patterns that you know you need to be aware of when you're in English speaking contexts.

00:00:32:13 - 00:01:06:19
Mary Daphne
And so this is one of the reasons we do these, to give you that opportunity to improve your listening skills, your comprehension skills, your pronunciation, learning, new vocab and new expressions as well. And today, we're going to dove into a question that we get asked quite a bit here at Advanced English. So the question is, what are some of the differences between U.S., English, American, English and British English?

00:01:06:27 - 00:01:23:03
Mary Daphne
And there are a couple of varieties within British English, but we're going to speak about them globally. I think as Americans were not British, obviously. So we are going to give you our perspective. We've been there. We've been to the U.K. and.

00:01:23:11 - 00:01:32:15
Greg
Actually lived in Hong Kong while it was a British colony. So I have a little bit of direct life experience in a British colony, so that's perfect.

00:01:32:25 - 00:01:39:22
Mary Daphne
So we're going to jump right into this conversation. So grab a warm beverage and let's go to it.

00:01:42:13 - 00:01:53:28
Mary Daphne
All right. So let's break it into a few different categories. The first being the accents, which I think is the most stark contrast at the get go.

00:01:54:03 - 00:02:18:09
Greg
Yeah, it's definitely one of the most obvious ones. So first of all, when we're talking about the British accent, let's keep in mind that there are a wide range of accents depending on where you are in the UK. Right. So different regions are going to have different ways of saying things and that includes the accent. There's quite a bit of diversity.

00:02:18:09 - 00:02:28:00
Greg
In fact, definitely. And once you hear the differences, it's quite obvious the one that is most commonly taught is, do you know, do you remember the name?

00:02:28:11 - 00:02:59:12
Mary Daphne
I believe it's received pronunciation r.p. Some people, I think, refer to it as Queen's English. So if you've watched the popular Netflix series The Crown, you'll notice there's a specific type of English. I think that's even more specific to the royal family. But if you think about people who are maybe in the media, so maybe a broadcast journalist they might speak with received pronunciation.

00:02:59:17 - 00:03:20:17
Mary Daphne
Of course, as Greg said, there's so many varietals. And so if you're in a part of the UK that doesn't use receive pronunciation broadly, then it might be that dialect. So that's something to keep in mind. And much like the UK in the United States, we have that variety as well. If you go to the south, you're going to hear certain pronunciation.

00:03:20:17 - 00:03:28:17
Mary Daphne
If you go to the West, you're going to hear a certain pronunciation. If you're in the Northeast, you'll hear a certain pronunciation. So what's our accent?

00:03:28:17 - 00:03:35:03
Greg
Our accent? I always say I have no accent, which of course, is not the correct thing to say. But it doesn't feel like I have an accent.

00:03:35:03 - 00:03:38:19
Mary Daphne
Right? Right. So our accent is actually northeastern.

00:03:39:13 - 00:03:40:10
Greg
Northeastern. That makes.

00:03:40:10 - 00:03:54:13
Mary Daphne
Sense. Yeah. Yeah. So, you know, that's just specific to people who are from the Northeast east in the United States, but back to the UK. So that's the received pronunciation that we're dealing with. Yeah.

00:03:54:26 - 00:04:16:06
Greg
That makes sense. Yeah. And it's it is remarkable how different the different accents can sound. It almost sounds like it's from a different country. Another very common one is called Cockney. Yes, Cockney English. Yeah. And if you hear the. It's. But in any event, I find the received English to be one of the most beautiful forms of English.

00:04:16:12 - 00:04:28:10
Mary Daphne
Yes, it's very easy on the ears. It's very delicate, refined. It immediately sounds classy. It sounds, you know, assertive, but also very elegant.

00:04:28:13 - 00:04:43:01
Greg
Yeah. Yeah, it's nice. It's definitely nice in the ears. And it has this funny effect, at least on Americans of making the person sound very smart and educated. So if someone speaking in received English, you tend to want to agree with them, whatever it is they're saying.

00:04:43:05 - 00:05:05:09
Mary Daphne
That's true. So I thought one interesting comparison between you see a transformation happening in one of the most popular plays and films called My Fair Lady and Audrey Hepburn. If you know who if you know, you know. So Audrey Hepburn is one of my favorite actresses. I think many of you out there as well, because she's an international icon.

00:05:05:18 - 00:05:35:04
Mary Daphne
And what's really interesting is that if you watch that film, you'll see someone using the Cockney accent all the way after a transformation into the received pronunciation. And she works with a linguist and a person who teaches her phonology and phonetics. And they go through a series of different practice drills. And it's this whole progression. I really recommend that film, especially on this topic here.

00:05:35:04 - 00:05:39:28
Mary Daphne
So you get some exposure to those different types of accents.

00:05:39:29 - 00:05:43:15
Greg
A British accent? Yeah, it's a true classic. It's a really good one. Yeah.

00:05:44:05 - 00:06:11:21
Mary Daphne
All right. So that's really in terms of accent. But if you go to the UK, I think you'll start as you're immersed in the culture there. There's so many subcultures as we know and they're all geographically, you know, geographically based as well. Right. So you'll start to get more accustomed to understanding those different dialects. The other thing you can do, if you're curious, is check out some films, I believe.

00:06:11:22 - 00:06:32:09
Mary Daphne
Billy Elliot, do you remember that? Oh, yeah. That was a very strong accent as well. Right. So I remember having some difficulty. Even though I'm a native English speaker, I had to put subtitles. Even though they were speaking in English, it was the type of English that I wasn't very familiar with at the time. And this was, you know, several years ago.

00:06:32:21 - 00:06:34:05
Mary Daphne
But it was interesting.

00:06:34:06 - 00:06:44:02
Greg
Yeah, I mean, that's a good point. Right. Even even native English speakers, speakers like us, you know, we sometimes need the subtitles if the accents heavy enough.

00:06:44:03 - 00:07:06:15
Mary Daphne
Yeah. And that's perfectly fine. So don't think that. Oh, as native English speakers, all native English speakers understand other native English speakers of English with different accents like Australia-New Zealand, you know, global English with South African. Right. South African, UK. And all the varieties within that.

00:07:06:16 - 00:07:11:22
Greg
I'm holding back really hard from trying to demonstrate these. I'm terrible with accents, but I love speaking to them.

00:07:11:26 - 00:07:35:04
Mary Daphne
So that's the thing that you bring up. An interesting point there, Greg, because if it's an education, if there's a reason to do it and it's supposed to be educational, then, you know, that's one thing. But a lot of people take offense and they in the US, let's say I don't know how it is in the UK, but in the US if you try to replicate an accent, they might think that you're making fun.

00:07:35:19 - 00:07:44:02
Mary Daphne
So it's a very delicate balance of how do you model a certain pronunciation or accent without offending.

00:07:44:12 - 00:07:58:11
Greg
That's a good point. Yeah. Often I think when people the reason that happens is I think when people try and imitate another accent, they tend to exaggerate it. Yes. And they might also adapt some of the stereotypical mannerisms.

00:07:58:22 - 00:07:59:15
Mary Daphne
Or non-verbal.

00:07:59:15 - 00:08:17:11
Greg
Vocabulary which which I'm sure we'll get to as well. And as a result, it ends up being potentially offensive. A lot of times it isn't, and it's just for fun. And it's certainly not intended to be, but it is, you're right. Something to be mindful of when when, you know, sampling other accents.

00:08:17:12 - 00:08:40:18
Mary Daphne
Absolutely. So what I always like to say is read the room. So if you're in you know, if you're with your spouse or your partner or your best friend and you're just trying out because it's fun to try out different ways of speaking in the privacy and comfort of your own home. That's you know, that's one thing. If you're doing it with the intention of maybe making fun, that's a completely different thing.

00:08:40:18 - 00:08:43:05
Mary Daphne
That's a big no no in my book. What about you?

00:08:43:17 - 00:08:45:07
Greg
Yeah, of course. Yes. Yeah.

00:08:45:17 - 00:08:47:18
Mary Daphne
Right. Just want to make sure.

00:08:47:19 - 00:08:55:25
Greg
Yeah. My objective should never to be offensive, but it's more so about just being aware that what you think might not be offensive could be offensive to other people.

00:08:56:02 - 00:09:14:25
Mary Daphne
And if that were the case, then you apologized profusely. You that was not my intention because, you know, when you're trying out different accents, let's say you are an English native, let's say you're a non-native English speaker, an ESL learner, and you want to know which accent to use. Maybe you want to try out what feels good on you, right?

00:09:14:25 - 00:09:31:27
Mary Daphne
You want to know what you want to know. The sensations of using an American accent or receive pronunciation or a manchester accent or a Cockney accent. Right. It really comes down to preference and the only way to know that is to try. So that's something to keep in mind.

00:09:31:28 - 00:09:53:21
Greg
Yeah. And the other thing I'll say is a great way to practice it is with that a person who has that accent. So if you come to that person with an accent that you want to try and replicate and say, Hey, I'm really interested in trying to speak the way you do, could you could you, you know, help me walk through a few words to to sort of parse out the distance, the differences?

00:09:53:21 - 00:10:16:20
Greg
Yes. That's a great way to approach it. Right. And it's sort of open minded in educational context. And I personally, I love hearing, you know, British speakers trying to emulate the American accent, because it's fun for me to hear the things that I don't even notice when someone's trying to replicate my accent, they'll they'll say things in ways that I didn't realize I was actually saying them as well.

00:10:17:14 - 00:10:27:00
Greg
So I enjoy it and I love helping other people speak the way I do if that's of interest to them. And so that's something you can consider if you want to try out one of these accents.

00:10:27:09 - 00:10:49:16
Mary Daphne
What I really like to do, if we are watching a film or a series and the lead or the protagonist, the main character is actually someone from the UK, like a British actor or actress, but they replicate an American accent and sometimes you, if you're not paying attention, you won't notice because they'll do it so beautifully, so well.

00:10:49:29 - 00:11:19:25
Mary Daphne
But then every once in a while you'll notice maybe something a little bit different. And I always love trying to figure out who's like, you know, from the US and who's from the UK when they're doing it, because sometimes you really can't tell, but other times you can. And the giveaway, in my opinion, is that when there's a British actor and they're trying to replicate the American accent, sometimes it comes out too beautiful, too clear, like they're doing too well of the job.

00:11:19:29 - 00:11:44:03
Mary Daphne
It's too perfect. Whereas, you know, when we're speaking in American English, we have a lot of connected speech happening. Like it's not as articulate always. So that's something to keep in mind. All right. Moving on to vocabulary and some words and some expression differences. So two come to mind. One is candy and sweets.

00:11:44:21 - 00:11:48:08
Greg
Great. I was going to say before we go into specifics, let's talk a little bigger picture.

00:11:48:09 - 00:11:49:08
Mary Daphne
Bigger picture, good idea.

00:11:49:25 - 00:12:23:15
Greg
So what I found is that British English tends to be a little more indirect, right? So the words that they use tend to be a little less literal, perhaps a little less, for lack of a better word, aggressive. Right. There's just a more subtle touch to the English vocabulary than there is in an American vocabulary. So bigger picture that that's sort of what I observed living in Hong Kong.

00:12:23:15 - 00:12:27:21
Greg
Yeah. I'm not sure if you had any observations in that regard.

00:12:28:04 - 00:12:38:10
Mary Daphne
I think I would agree with you. I mean I've I've traveled to the UK several times and I think yeah, there's like the delicate sort of finesse to it.

00:12:38:11 - 00:12:38:27
Greg
Yeah.

00:12:39:01 - 00:12:39:14
Mary Daphne
Yeah.

00:12:41:00 - 00:12:44:22
Greg
In terms of specific vocab. So you were saying candy and sweets.

00:12:44:22 - 00:12:46:06
Mary Daphne
Yeah. That's something that comes to mind.

00:12:46:07 - 00:12:56:21
Greg
Yeah. Yes. Sweets. When you said sweets, that immediately brought me back to my childhood Halloween in Hong Kong because yeah, all my British friends, you know, said, let's go get some sweets. Yeah.

00:12:57:15 - 00:13:09:00
Mary Daphne
Exactly. So yeah, that's one difference. The other one is like pram and stroller. A pram is a stroller. So in the US, a stroller in the UK they say pram. Um.

00:13:09:09 - 00:13:19:09
Greg
I get, I get, I get hit on a few of these all the time. So I always love seeing a car park. A car park. Yeah. There's a car park. Is a car park over there.

00:13:19:15 - 00:13:19:26
Mary Daphne
Yeah.

00:13:19:26 - 00:13:21:23
Greg
Where in the US. It's a parking lot.

00:13:21:23 - 00:13:22:06
Mary Daphne
Right.

00:13:24:02 - 00:13:29:23
Greg
The Brits tend to see say aircon turn on the aircon.

00:13:29:23 - 00:13:32:02
Mary Daphne
Aircon when we say air conditioner or is the.

00:13:32:06 - 00:13:39:08
Greg
AC in the US ac. Um, let's see. Medicine is medicine.

00:13:39:14 - 00:13:40:02
Mary Daphne
Really.

00:13:40:13 - 00:13:40:17
Greg
Is.

00:13:40:24 - 00:13:41:15
Mary Daphne
Medicine.

00:13:41:26 - 00:13:43:24
Greg
Often medicine. Yes. Aluminum.

00:13:43:24 - 00:14:05:21
Mary Daphne
Aluminum, aluminum. So you bring up another good point. So in English and so in English with us English and UK English, there are a couple of words where the intonation and the emphasis is going to be different. For example, we in America say garage, right where you park your car, a carpark parking lot is what we would say in the US.

00:14:06:04 - 00:14:12:13
Mary Daphne
But you know, car park is understood as well. Car park and then in the UK they say garrets.

00:14:13:10 - 00:14:23:21
Greg
That's right. Yeah. Right. Yeah. See that's funny. I didn't even notice. You're right. We were talking about different words and I was actually talking about different pronunciation pronunciations of the same.

00:14:23:21 - 00:14:46:19
Mary Daphne
Right. Yes. So there's two different things going on. You have the words that are different but mean the same thing. So the sweets and candy example, the pram and the stroller example, and then you have these situations where the word is the same, spelled the same, but the intonation, pronunciation will be different. So another one is massage. In the US we say massage.

00:14:47:01 - 00:14:48:25
Mary Daphne
And then can you guess that they say in the UK.

00:14:48:25 - 00:14:49:16
Greg
Massage.

00:14:49:22 - 00:14:58:21
Mary Daphne
Message massage. Yeah. Yeah. And I think that's a little bit like more of a friendship. So a massage, right. You would say in French. Yeah. Yeah, I bet.

00:14:58:21 - 00:14:59:11
Greg
You're right about that.

00:14:59:11 - 00:15:04:15
Mary Daphne
Yeah. There might be some influence there. And then there's the another one. Advertisement.

00:15:05:13 - 00:15:06:05
Greg
Advertisement.

00:15:06:05 - 00:15:06:27
Mary Daphne
Advertisement.

00:15:07:06 - 00:15:30:11
Greg
Yeah. Yeah. So those are pronunciations. And then there are different words. At the end of the day, though, typically speaking, as you know, as an English language learner yourself, you'll know the specific vocab that's used doesn't necessarily matter that much as long as you have the context. That's right. Right. If you have the context, you can kind of piece together what's being said and you kind of know what they're saying regardless.

00:15:30:11 - 00:15:37:04
Greg
But there's there's never a harm in asking if you're confused about a specific word that was used.

00:15:37:05 - 00:15:41:18
Mary Daphne
That's right. And in terms of slang, like I don't have any context with slang. British slang.

00:15:41:26 - 00:15:45:17
Greg
Yeah, I could try, but I would just make a fool of myself.

00:15:46:08 - 00:16:14:13
Mary Daphne
So yeah. So that's, you know, you can ask a Brit, but, but in any event, slang is the type of language you would use when you're, you know, out with friends. It's not in it's not a the register of language that you would use in a formal setting or an education context. It's, you know, it's argot, it's casual and even more so than casual, it's like super relaxed.

00:16:14:21 - 00:16:30:16
Greg
And what's also interesting is that some words that are quite British have been incorporated into American culture as well. Yes, one that I come across all the time now is people love to say cheers when they're like as a as a.

00:16:31:06 - 00:16:31:19
Mary Daphne
Sign.

00:16:31:19 - 00:16:32:18
Greg
Of a sign off.

00:16:32:18 - 00:16:33:23
Mary Daphne
I see that a lot in emails.

00:16:33:23 - 00:16:48:08
Greg
Emails, they'll say Cheers, cheers. Or if you're hanging up the phone, you say cheers before hanging up the phone. That's definitely a British thing. It's yeah, it's not a it's not an American thing, but Americans like to use it now. Yeah, I think the Americans who use it kind of feel classy doing it.

00:16:48:08 - 00:16:48:27
Mary Daphne
Cheers.

00:16:48:28 - 00:16:49:15
Greg
Cheers.

00:16:49:24 - 00:17:09:18
Mary Daphne
Yeah, it's interesting we have that word, but it means something different is when you raise a glass as a toast or you clink glasses together. But cheers could be just by or. Yeah, it's on the way out of a conversation or signing off an email. Exactly. In terms of culture, I think you can speak to this one quite well with the humor aspects of culture.

00:17:09:18 - 00:17:21:09
Greg
Yes. So one part of it was what I mentioned before, that sort of subtlety that indirectness. Right. Americans are famous, are notorious for being notorious as the bad version of famous.

00:17:21:09 - 00:17:29:06
Mary Daphne
Yeah. The other word for that is infamous. Infamous, so famous. And then if you put it in as a prefix in infamous.

00:17:29:06 - 00:17:36:01
Greg
Meaning notorious. Exactly. Yeah. Americans are notorious for being very direct, overt, overt.

00:17:36:01 - 00:17:41:11
Mary Daphne
Right. We like rub it in your face kind of thing like okay, that's what is happening.

00:17:41:12 - 00:18:07:04
Greg
Or there's a lack of of was diplomacy, right? Yeah. That we just we're not going to mince our words. We're going to say exactly what's on our minds. Whereas the Brits, in my experience, tend to be a little more reserved with their opinion. You know, instead of Americans saying, okay, let me get the British version, the British version, if someone says something, the response might be interesting.

00:18:07:04 - 00:18:12:03
Greg
Yeah. Whereas in America they might say, Huh, that sounds stupid.

00:18:12:14 - 00:18:35:17
Mary Daphne
Right? So, you know, we don't shy away from showing emotions most of the time. Of course, everyone is different. But generally speaking, as a people, as a culture, collective, whole, you know, you'll find a lot of situations where people in the U.S. are very expressive with their emotions and they'll say it out loud and be direct about it.

00:18:35:17 - 00:18:41:07
Mary Daphne
Whereas in the UK exactly what we call that a stiff upper lip, right? Having a stiff upper lip.

00:18:41:08 - 00:18:48:09
Greg
That's another good other one. Yeah, that's a good one. So stiff upper lip is another important one which is about more so emotional.

00:18:48:09 - 00:18:49:27
Mary Daphne
As brushing your emotions.

00:18:50:08 - 00:19:33:00
Greg
Right and being able to articulate the way you feel. And even the US has some, some troubles. I think everywhere in the world there's they're struggling, they struggle with this. But the ability to articulate the way you feel, whether you're happy, you're sad, you're anxious, right. Frustrated, the stiff upper lip is basically indicating or it alludes to the importance of not revealing the way you feel in order to appear more calm, professional and collected and stable as a human being and the stiff upper lip specifically is referring to a lip that wavers when you're sort of about to cry.

00:19:33:01 - 00:19:51:15
Greg
Yeah, right. The stiff upper lip says, you know, don't cry, you know, lock down your emotions and behave like an adult. And so that is that is something that is traditionally associated with the British sort of culture.

00:19:51:16 - 00:19:55:14
Mary Daphne
It's like the keep calm and carry on. And there's so many different versions of that.

00:19:55:14 - 00:19:56:07
Greg
Soldier on.

00:19:56:07 - 00:20:09:03
Mary Daphne
Yes, soldier on. Don't show your emotions. And, you know, other cultures have that, too. I would say Japan is one of them, right, where you don't necessarily show all your emotions in the US. Most of the time we do show how we're feeling.

00:20:09:09 - 00:20:11:08
Greg
You might be a little more emotive. Emotive?

00:20:11:12 - 00:20:18:06
Mary Daphne
Yeah, that's true. So that's an interesting observation. Yeah. And then with humor. So there are a lot of Oh yeah.

00:20:18:12 - 00:20:48:22
Greg
So I find British, British humor to be hilarious. It's pretty dry. Yeah. I'm trying to think about how to describe. Yeah, dry humor. Dry humor can be sparse, right? So you have to kind of really pay attention to what's being said. They they're also phenomenal, phenomenal satirists. Right. They're very good with satire. They are. They're also very self-deprecating.

00:20:49:15 - 00:20:50:17
Mary Daphne
So let's define that.

00:20:50:21 - 00:20:58:14
Greg
So self self-deprecating means basically insulting yourself, right? Making yourself seem like the fool. And it's the.

00:20:58:14 - 00:20:59:18
Mary Daphne
Opposite of bragging or.

00:20:59:19 - 00:21:29:16
Greg
Yes, it's it's it's actually a form of humility. Yeah. And I think it's actually a very healthy type of humor because it does show that you're willing to, you know, you don't take yourself too seriously. Yeah. And so I think it's terrific. It's a great way to, you know, observe things that are frustrating, particularly societal things that are frustrating in a way that's also, you know, expressing humility.

00:21:29:16 - 00:21:41:09
Mary Daphne
Yeah. Yeah. So that's so some popular there's a very popular series in the U.S. that was based on a successful series in the U.K. Prior to that, the office. Right.

00:21:41:09 - 00:21:44:13
Greg
The Office, one of the most popular shows ever, ever made.

00:21:44:13 - 00:21:58:23
Mary Daphne
Yeah. So it was well-received in the U.S., which was, I think, surprising to the producers and the showrunners of that show in the U.S. context, because it's more of the excuse, more on the side of British humor. Yeah, yeah, yeah.

00:21:59:12 - 00:22:14:16
Greg
At the end of the day, they're masters of the language, right? And so a lot of their humor has to do with little plays on words. And, you know, it's clever. If there is one way to for me to describe Hiroshima, it's clever. Yeah. Which is also quite a British word.

00:22:14:16 - 00:22:34:25
Mary Daphne
Yeah. And then the last one that we're not going to spend too much time on is the spelling. So you'll notice in the U.S. that we'll use o r if we're writing color. And if they're writing color in the U.K., it's Oh, you are color or what's another one? Um, can you think of anything you probably know out there?

00:22:35:13 - 00:22:37:25
Greg
Yeah, I feel like it's funny.

00:22:37:27 - 00:22:38:22
Mary Daphne
Humor is.

00:22:38:22 - 00:22:39:09
Greg
Warmer.

00:22:39:28 - 00:22:56:18
Mary Daphne
You know, humor. Humor. We write, we wait, we write that the the British way, I guess. But in any event, you'll see, you know, in a lot of a lot of cases there's an added you. Whereas in the U.S. we remove the U and we just put the L. So color in color, for example.

00:22:57:05 - 00:23:03:01
Greg
Is a wrong with E too. I think sometimes you get the point is there little, little, little answers lozenges yet?

00:23:03:01 - 00:23:25:27
Mary Daphne
But most of the time the pronunciation is not that well, the pronunciation is different, but the intonation and the emphasis will be most of the time the same. Yeah, in some cases you'll get the advertisement and advertisement situation, but most of the time, in my experience, I've been able to have a conversation with friends I have in the U.K. and, you know, follow them just fine.

00:23:26:05 - 00:23:46:19
Greg
Yeah, for the most part, I find where that I run into that issue is if I'm typing something, the spell checker, if it's using British English, it might, you know, have an issue with the way I write write something versus if it's an American English, you know, you can always change that setting on on your operating system. But but that's what you might encounter.

00:23:46:19 - 00:23:52:21
Mary Daphne
Yeah, that's a good point. And if you're going to do that, you have to be consistent. You can't spell one thing with U.K. pronounce don't.

00:23:52:21 - 00:23:53:12
Greg
Mix and match.

00:23:53:12 - 00:24:14:08
Mary Daphne
Yeah. And then you cancel another thing with the American because then you're just going to have wrong spelling because someone's going to say, okay, is this British or is this. That's right. Yeah. Okay, so you have to decide. But yes, so that's kind of an overview. Again, we're from the United States of America. So I think, you know, there's a lot more that we could probably talk about if we were British.

00:24:14:08 - 00:24:15:01
Mary Daphne
In that sense.

00:24:15:02 - 00:24:16:20
Greg
We should really do this with a British.

00:24:16:20 - 00:24:42:12
Mary Daphne
Person. Yeah, we should get a comment below. If there's any British language YouTubers out there with received pronunciation or otherwise, let us know. Maybe I would love to do one. Honestly with Caroline Gervin, my favorite fitness fitness lady. She has the Northern Ireland accent, so that's part of the UK, but that's a different accent completely. Right. So that would be really fun.

00:24:42:12 - 00:25:01:02
Mary Daphne
But anyway, that's that's it for this conversation. Let us know what you think in the comments. Share it with friends, or be sure that you're subscribed and you're following. And if you leave us a nice review, that always makes a huge difference. It brightens our day because it tells us that you're enjoying the content to keep it coming.

00:25:01:11 - 00:25:24:13
Mary Daphne
And we get a sense of, you know, what types of conversations you like, what types of lessons you love and all that wonderful, all that jazz, as we say, the U.S. So we're going to see you in another one very, very soon. I'm free now.